Selected comments left by Nominators in the 2018-2019 Season. Nominators are encouraged but not required to leave comments. The number of comments is not indicative of overall Nominator scoring. Please report any errors to tps@tpsonline.org.

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Number of entries: 3927
Twist of the Magi  - The Phoenix Theatre
Kelsey Boulton (Mrs. Marcetti/Madame Sofronie)

Great sense of humor!


 Twist of the Magi  - The Phoenix Theatre
Larry Albert (Rex Radison/Chamberlain)

Superb timing, his character work was solid and he clearly had a different relationship with each other character.


 Twist of the Magi  - The Phoenix Theatre
Larry Albert (Rex Radison/Chamberlain)

Ah! That voice! Great comedic timing, and wonderful presence.


 Twist of the Magi  - The Phoenix Theatre
Melanie Calderwood (Betsey)

Great expressions nice physical comedy.


 Twist of the Magi  - The Phoenix Theatre
Melanie Calderwood (Betsey)

This role is the most demanding, and requires impeccable comedic timing. Melanie Calderwood knows how to say volumes without opening her mouth! This show would not have been nearly as much fun without this excellent performance.


 Twist of the Magi  - The Phoenix Theatre
Mia Perritt (Twister Sister/Yoni)

I absolutely adored this actress. Great femme fatale twisted sister embodiment that was juxtaposed with the ridiculous and playful high-pitched voice of Yoni.


 Twist of the Magi  - The Phoenix Theatre
Mia Perritt (Twister Sister/Yoni)

Nice vocals and expressiveness. Her characterization of secondary character, Yoni was farcical and fun and helped it "look" like a radio production.


 Twist of the Magi  - The Phoenix Theatre
Other/Final Comments

I wish I could score Props simply because of all the noisemaking devices that were amazing.


 Twist of the Magi  - The Phoenix Theatre
Other/Final Comments

What an absolutely WONDERFUL production with true heart! I was grinning ear to ear and singing along at the end. I left with a glow in my heart and a nostalgic wish for radio theatre of the 1940s and 50s to make a comeback. Great Twisted Sister choreography and perfect harmonies! Hilarious sound effects! Thank you for a delightful evening!


 Twist of the Magi  - The Phoenix Theatre
Susan Connors (Denise/Mrs. Mandelbread)

Delightful as Mrs. Mandelbread! What could have been an offensive caricature was a fully developed character. Just silly enough to balance out the heart of the role. Lovely performance.


 Twist of the Magi  - The Phoenix Theatre
Susan Connors (Denise/Mrs. Mandelbread)

Very charming character - her accent was consistent and her comic timing was very good.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Aviona Rodriguez-Brown (Sofia)

Clear, affecting open-hearted work. The love and yearning of this character sparkled in her eyes.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Aviona Rodriguez-Brown (Sofia)

She was so wonderful in her range of acting. She had moments of real believable naivety and also moments of strong maturity in perfect character. She navigated between light and funny moments and very serious moments with expert care.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Comments (Scenic)

The strategy of building the set around the audience brought the setting to life, as well as emphasizing its claustrophobic nature.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Defining Moment

Aviona's monologue in the second act was one of my favorites. Up to that point she played the soft ingenue that was sweet but perhaps too eager to please, and in this monologue she made a point of pointing blame where blame was due. She demanded what she wanted in life, and made sure everyone knew about.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Defining Moment

Aviona's real piano playing was a beautiful commitment to character.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Defining Moment

Lieutenant Portuondo's drunken entrance was an unsurprising but dramatic expression of his passion for Maria Celia overcoming his soldierly professionalism.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Defining Moment

So many! I don't know how I can pick just one. The moments of movement and music where the sisters circled the space. The moment the piano is wheeled away. The moment Maria dropped the flower petals when touching hands with Portuondo. The mangoes on the table. The striking moments in lighting design the perfectly highlighted the sisters on the balcony, or when the lighting split the room to highlight each part of the scene with the piano repairman and the husband's letters.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Defining Moment

The build of the relationship between the lieutenant and Maria Celia lent itself fantastically to it's inevitable eruption in the final act. As an audience member, though it felt wrong, there was a part of me that wanted to see the two reconcile in that moment but another stronger feeling of vindication came over me as I watched Maria Celia tear the very fabric of the lieutenant's personhood. Making his retaliation of tearing the piano away from the sisters seem all the more tragic and petty. That feeling lingered long after the show was over.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Defining Moment

The look on Sofia's face at the start of Act II--the love in her eyes and the way the light hit her. That hope she was hanging on to was at the center of this play and it hit me clearly in that moment.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Defining Moment

The moment that's sticking with me is towards the very end, when the military men take the piano and a light is left illuminating the place where it stood. It's a good physical representation of the action and the emotional consequences of what's happened.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Defining Moment

The piano music playing, a light shining on the space where it once was.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Defining Moment

The plot twist at the end of Act I revealing the letters are in code


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Defining Moment

The rare presence of onstage oral sex on a woman, as opposed to a man.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Marquicia Dominguez (Maria Celia)

It was wonderful to see QuiQui in a role like this. They gave in fully to the journey of this character and all the shades of strength, vulnerability, fear, and anger. I truly hope to see them in more productions around town.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Marquicia Dominguez (Maria Celia)

She has such a talent for stillness and silence. She was captivating in her acting of minute detail in every moment of the play. Her physicality and habitation of the character never wavered. Her voice and facial expressions were absolutely perfect.


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Other/Final Comments

A beautifully dreamlike play that is pure magic from the writing to the acting and all aspects of the design. I would highly recommend this play to anyone!


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Roger Estrada (Lieutenant Portuondo)

An enigmatic performance that kept me guessing. Also, great drunk work!


 Two Sisters and a Piano  - Theater Schmeater
Roger Estrada (Lieutenant Portuondo)

The ever shifting expressions and body language of Roger Estrada (Lieutenant Portuondo) were mesmerizing as he evolved from professional soldier to passionate lover to cruel captor and back again.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Alexandra Tavares (Yelena)

Outstanding and nuanced performance. She savored each word of dialogue. I didn't recognize her she was so changed from Ironbound.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Comments (Costume)

Wonderful costumes! Stand-outs for me were the grey slacks worn by Yelena and her red coat and dressing gown.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Comments (Direction)

Again, I thought this play was so well blocked and executing that definitely falls to the credit of the actors but I usually credit the blocking design to a director and this play felt lived in...the house felt lived in partly because people moved so naturally and efficiently throughout. Not just blocking, though, I enjoyed this production thoroughly and as a whole package.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Comments (Ensemble)

Really wonderful individual performances all around but this also really felt like an ensemble. The blocking mentioned above really helped with that, too, but these felt like people that had real history with each other and I felt like a fly on the wall.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Comments (Lighting)

I especially enjoyed how the light caught the tendrils of grass at the end of the stage. The scrim also seemed to accurately transmute with the characters' feelings.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Comments (Scenic)

Another reason this play felt lived in, aside from the acting and the blocking specifically, was the wonderful and beautiful set. I found myself visualizing in my head where in this big mansion we were in based on the room I was looking at on stage and in relation to the other rooms in previous scenes. This felt like a home that was lived in and being lived in.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Comments (Scenic)

I enjoyed the way the curtains were elegantly draped and closed as the piece progressed to indicate how "boxed in" the remaining characters were.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Comments (Sound/Music)

Lovely choice of Russian music. Well-done on the gunshot as well.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Defining Moment

I really enjoyed the scene where Yelena and Sonya had a conversation about Sonya's interest in the doctor and Yelena, the object of everyone's own interest and affection expressed her own unhappiness and discontent.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Defining Moment

It's always the part with the gun when it comes to Chekhov.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Defining Moment

Snow day performance!


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Defining Moment

Sunam Ellis delivered a very moving performance as Sonya - perhaps best encapsulated in her haunting monologues. She shined most when she had room to take command of the stage.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Defining Moment

The best moment was when Yelena and Sonya were defying Serebryakov and playing the piano.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Defining Moment

The defining moment to me was the first time they had Vanya on stage witnessing the play's actions but when the character was not "on stage". They used it throughout the play and it was powerful throughout but it was just a really striking thing and encapsulated what I thought was such clever blocking in the entirety of the performance.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Defining Moment

The opening monolgue when the curtains were drawn to reveal the set was lovely - from the dark closed mind of Vanya to the light open expanse of the country.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Defining Moment

The opening scene with lighting and darkness so much larger than the furnishings and actors set the definition of this story, where every person feels so small against the expectations of society. Amazing.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Defining Moment

The switch to using an isolating spotlight on Vanya.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Defining Moment

Vanya's frustration, rage, and, inescapably, humor as, meaning to kill the Professor, he aims and pulls the trigger, and nothing comes out. Bang! he says.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Kevin Lin (Yefim)

Made the most of his small role! Fun to watch.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Other/Final Comments

I thought they did an excellent job with this play. Checkov is difficult to pull off and they did it and they did it well. They found the perfect balance of humor that is woven into the darkness of his pieces and they didn't stray off too far in either direction. Great work and congratulations!


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Other/Final Comments

Really just a top notch production of an old classic that felt brand new and very relevant to today. I know part of that is the original work, to be sure, but they really did this show justice. Bravo!


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Other/Final Comments

What the Seagull Project accomplishes with modest means outshines what many companies do with unlimited resources. They breathe new life into classic texts, and show a deep understanding of what it means to be human.


 Uncle Vanya  - The Seagull Project
Peter Crook (Vanya)

It's hard right now to imagine a different person playing that part!


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Colleen Carey (Yelena)

Had really lovely poise throughout, with integral moments of breaking her guard. Often the most compelling, even when in the background.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Comments (Actors)

The actors worked very well together, built and supported one another.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Comments (Ensemble)

Some actors definitely stood out, but overall they all belonged to the same world. I could see them all living in this house.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Comments (Lighting)

Very warm, naturalistic, and homey. Which was perfect for the show and the specific atmosphere.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Comments (Scenic)

I really loved the set. the set, especially because it was in the round. The design served the needs of the production and allows the actors to use the space to the advantage of the production. By putting it in the round and using really home and naturalistic set pieces, I felt much more a part of the action. I understood immediately the world this play was going to exist in.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Comments (Scenic)

Minimal and simple but excellent.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Comments (Sound/Music)

Really beautiful music to set the scene as the audience was coming in and during intermission. The sounds felt real and helped add specificity to the locale.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
David S. Klein (Telegin)

Very funny. I loved the string bit with Marina at the end. Very compelling and often the character I felt for the most. He added lovely moments to his character and his physical choices felt appropriately realistic yet almost heightened to the comedic.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Defining Moment

There is a point in the final scene when the Doctor and Yelena are kissing after an excrutiating build-up, and I was pretty sure that Sonia would walk in and see them - to devastating effect.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Defining Moment

If I were to choose a particular moment from this play, it would be when the action stopped and the lights changed as Yelena was trapped by her suitor on the bench, her face raised to the light. Then Waffles entered, playing that beautiful, sad music. It was a lovely moment.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Defining Moment

The plucking of one string of the guitar as it lies there on the ottoman.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Defining Moment

The scene with the two women, Sonya and Yelena, when they are discussing their feelings for the doctor.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Defining Moment

There was a very sincere moment between Sonya and Yelena when the professor said that Yelena could not play her music. There was only one sentence "He said no." But all the disappointment and tension that was contained in those three words felt truly palpable between them.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Defining Moment

Tim Gagne's drunk act was subtle and engaging.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Defining Moment

When Colleen Carey walked in for the first time! Yowza!


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Defining Moment

Yelena's soliloquy in act 3. A lovely, genuine moment with the audience. I could really see her go through something and I was right there for the ride.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Laura Bannister (Sonya)

Bannister’s portrayal of Sonya was clear, fluid and heartbreaking. The play was, for me, Sonia’s tragedy more than Vanya’s.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Laura Bannister (Sonya)

Had some really lovely moments with Yelena, often the most compelling onstage.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Michael Ramquist (Serebryakov)

Michael Ramquist found every corner of this character’s psyche and was completely believable in every moment. Completely unhinged to utterly sensible, annoying and pedantic to suffering and sympathy-inducing, he fully inhabited the Professor’s being.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Michael Ramquist (Serebryakov)

Very interesting, lots of energy. Had a King Lear like quality. The actor believed what he was saying and definitely presented a larger than life character that was compelling.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Other/Final Comments

The venue was very appealing, and I was sorry to hear that it is soon to be torn down. I think it was a good setting for this production.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Other/Final Comments

This was beautifully done! This is the most accessible experience I've ever had with Chekov. I loved the intimacy of the space, and how it was staged in the round. I felt at a perfect distance to the action at all times! I loved it!


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Terry Edward Moore (Uncle Vanya)

Had a really lovely and deep voice. I truly empathized with him and how awful he felt.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Therese Diekhans (Marina)

Absolutely lovely work. Every moment was clear, engaging, and funny. I always looked forward to her interactions, especially with waffles.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Therese Diekhans (Marina)

Wonderful character.


 Uncle Vanya  - Theatre 9/12
Tim Gagne (Astrov)

Made choices for the character that I had never thought of before. He also had lots of energy.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Asa Sholdez (Theo)

His level of intensity was comedic but strengthened his character as well.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Comments (Scenic)

The set was an unexpected delight! Tons of attention to detail in every knick knack and doilie on every shelf. The flooring, the molding, the furniture- it all set the scene perfectly and you knew exactly where you were the moment you walked into the theatre!


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Comments (Scenic)

Wonderful attention to all the props. The lace curtains, doilies, and tablecloths were especially appropriate for the culture and time period.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Curt Simmons (Frank Versati)

Mr. Simmons stole the show! He was hilariously dramatic and delightfully sexy and alluring - at times almost a bit creepy, in a very intriguing way. He drew me in completely, and I hope he continues his "second theatre career" after a long hiatus.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Defining Moment

Curt Simmons brought a magnetic presence to his portrayal of the poet Versati, astutely capturing the character's grounding in lofty ideals. But what I most appreciated was his commitment to listening to his co-star Renee Gilbert (Louise Maske). In a world where men's attraction to women often leads to sexual violence, Simmons' listening represented for me a subtle but essential "consent" where this relationship could have been portrayed with a much more violent and triggering vocabulary. (at least, in the opinion of this cis-gendered male...)


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Defining Moment

just about anytime Gertrude was onstage. I loved to look at her facial expressions.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Defining Moment

The original script for this play is from Germany in 1910 and comedian/actor Steve Martin adapted it for the modern stage. There are many times in this show that seem so "Steve Martin", including a lot of inside jokes that reference things that his fans will find to be particularly funny. There was a lot of extreme audience laughter throughout this show which added to the hilarity.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Defining Moment

The set was fantastic!


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Defining Moment

The timing of the actors during the final moment of scene two (when the men are fighting) and scene three (when she is waiting in her underpants) was spot on! It made these moments undeniably funny and very memorable.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Defining Moment

The unprintable antepenultimate line of dialogue.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Defining Moment

This is a play where the audience longs to be winked at, and the few, carefully chosen moments where this production delivered were delicious. I especially enjoyed Gertrude and Theo caressing faces in excess.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
James Lynch (Benjamin Cohen)

Great at physical comedy, very nimble.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Melanie Calderwood (Gertrude)

Her lines were delivered in a tone of seriousness (deadpan) that added made her character even funnier and her timing was spot on.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Other/Final Comments

A really funny play that was cast very well, which made for a thoroughly enjoyable show.


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Other/Final Comments

The Phoenix Theatre is a little gem tucked away in Everett!


 Underpants, The  - The Phoenix Theatre Company
Tom Cook (Klinglehoff)

Hilarious in his moments of silence (standing in the doorway).


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Arika Matoba (Little Sally)

Terrific performance!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Brandon O'Neill (Officer Lockstock)

Good strong presence.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Brandon O'Neill (Officer Lockstock)

Brandon O'Neill had a powerful command of the stage. He was the perfect choice for the narrator, with his strong presence, perfect poise, sharp movements, and winning smile. I half-expected to see a twinkle of light certain times when he flashed us that grin. Perfect audience pleaser!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Brandon O'Neill (Officer Lockstock)

He was literally the best part of the show. Hilarious, comic timing was perfect.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Chris Ensweiler (Senator Flipp)

Loved the character traits he incorporated into his character (such as a comedic walk).


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Chris Ensweiler (Senator Flipp)

Wonderful actor with great sense of comic timing and detail to character.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Actors)

Sarah Russell was excellent among the ensemble. She was a joy to watch and listen to.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Choreography)

Clean and well executed. The choreography supported the exquisite storytelling. It was simple yet added to the visual complexity and interest. The synchrony (among the ensemble and with the lighting) was fantastic!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Choreography)

I felt like the first act was choreographed by one person, and Act 2, another. The first act was very Step touch, and the second was far more intricate.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Choreography)

Some very strong moments and smart choices.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Choreography)

The choreography was brilliant and did a nice job using the space and keeping the sight lines open. I particularly appreciated the movement on the word "Urinetown" during the first number (and a couple others), especially when everyone was singing the word at different times. It looked very cool. And the synchronicity of Officers Lockstock and Barrel in their number was perfect!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Costume)

Great work with the ensemble! Nicely done with the Cladwell gang!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Costume)

I was amazed by the different looks and quick costume changes.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Direction)

The director knew what they were doing. Thank you for blessing us with this piece of performance art! I would see it again and again!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Direction)

The use of space was phenomenal. I loved when the characters entered from the pit. Also I was engrossed by the opening moment when Lockstock enters through the audience. It was a strong directorial choice that immediately broke down the fourth wall and set a precedent for the rest of the show.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Ensemble)

Great group of people, really worked well together.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Ensemble)

I can't think of any moment when the cast wasn't in perfect sync. It was truly mesmerizing.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Lighting)

JESUS THE LIGHTING. <3 Perfect gel selection, concise spots, beautiful textures. Fantastic.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Lighting)

The lighting was beautiful, starting with the "atmosphere" at top-of-show and the lighting changes during the Prelude, setting the tone of certain musical transitions. Loved it! And the projections were delightful and fun, while also being a bit disturbing (i.e. eyeballs, falling people, etc.)


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Lighting)

The projection of the characters falling was so clever and the bright color choices added to the atmosphere of the show (creating an eerie feeling that supported the creation of "Urinetown"). Also, the synchrony between lights and choreography was impeccably well done!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Scenic)

A good, strong design in this space. Something new and unusual! And a real feat of engineering!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Scenic)

Great use of the space and creating different levels through the set.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Scenic)

What struck me first upon entering the theater was the staircase hanging from the ceiling. Beautiful, artistic, and terribly frightening. A Stage Manager's nightmare, if not built well and traversed safely. But throughout the show, everyone looked perfectly safe and confident walking, running, and dancing up and down the stairs. Excellently executed!

Next, of course, was the pile of toilets - Funny and disturbing at the same time. They made me WANT to see the show...and I still had to wait another 20 minutes! Well done, scenic designer, well done.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

"Run, Freedom, Run" number stole the show- incredible vocals and hilarious directing.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

Dummy falling from the grid.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

Kurt Beattie entering on the large staircase. Great to see him on stage again!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

The chemistry and comedic back-and forth between Little Sally and Lockstock. Clean and hysterical.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

The Choral arrangement during Run Freedom Run.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

The dance break in Snuff The Girl


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

The final moments of "Run, Freedom, Run" when Bobby Strong is standing on the stairs singing out to the audience. It was a moment filled with such hope and such a strong ending to the first act. Also the clean execution of the choreography (not only in Run, Freedom, Run but in all the songs really).


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

The play is so disarming and pointed in its humor, but then it takes a masterful turn toward the uncomfortable when the people you're supposed to be rooting for incorporate culturally insensitive language and dance and you realize you're being asked to turn the judgement on yourself.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

The throwing of our protagonist to his death as shown via Vertigo Projections.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

There were moments of brilliance in nearly every song, and Officer Lockstock was especially magnetic and energizing. I could watch him all day! But if I had to choose one defining moment, it would have to be during "Run, Freedom, Run", during the accapella choral section. His look to the audience when he saw the power he had to control them was priceless! And the music during that section made my skin tingle. From that section until the end of the song, Mikko held us in the palm of his hand, and the entire ensemble was in sync. Powerful!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

When Bobby was tossed off of the building. I wasn't expecting this at all and was so sad and shocked.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Defining Moment

When they drop that body from the ceiling.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Kurt Beattie (Caldwell B. Cladwell)

Amazing job from Kurt. Perfect for this role!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Kurt Beattie (Caldwell B. Cladwell)

Dastardly and phenomenal.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Kurt Beattie (Caldwell B. Cladwell)

Lon Cheney as Benito Mussolini


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Leslie Law (Josephine Strong)

she was hilarious in this! A real force on stage.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Mari Nelson (Penelope Pennywise)

Very good, strong performance.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Mikko Juan (Bobby Strong)

Really carried this show well.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Mikko Juan (Bobby Strong)

He was so wholeheartedly committed to the role. I'm excited to see what he does next.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Other/Final Comments

Andi Alhadeff was fabulous in this! The show was great fun to watch. Had good moments overall and very engaging.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Other/Final Comments

First time seeing Urinetown and it was a riot!


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Sarah Rose Davis (Hope Cladwell)

Lovely performance, well done. Looked great in the part.


 Urinetown  - ACT Theatre & 5th Avenue Theatre
Sarah Rose Davis (Hope Cladwell)

Absolutely marvelous and a rare example of an actor who can make her contributions in a manner that fits the venue size and doesn't upstage others.


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Alaji (Samar)

Alaji felt very natural in this character.


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Alaji (Samar)

Alaji had such a strong first Act. Made me lean in and want to know more!


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Alaji (Samar)

This was a beautiful, subtle and compelling portrayal. Understated and deep.


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Comments (Lighting)

Projection work was great!


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Comments (Scenic)

Great establishment of setting in such an intimate space. I appreciated the transition to the hotel room, in particular.


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Comments (Scenic)

This set worked well in this space.


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Comments (Sound/Music)

The sounds were immediate and really told the story


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Defining Moment

Alaji's performance was very authentic, and comfortable almost seemingly effortless.
She was a stand out for sure.


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Defining Moment

Both Alaji and Fathiya performances of their monologues were outstanding.


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Defining Moment

I loved the use of YouTube clips in this play.


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Defining Moment

I really enjoyed the projections of real world events throughout the piece. A great reminder of the very real world that the play pulls from.


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Defining Moment

Samar's confessional about her sexual assault


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Defining Moment

The projections in between scenes were really wonderful. They changed with the mood of the country.


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Defining Moment

The reconsiliation scene at the top of act 2 was the defining moment of the play


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Defining Moment

When Samar handed Intisar her grandmothers hijab, and said "may no one force me to wear it, and may no one force you to take it off". It crystalized so much of the play's message


 Veils  - Macha Theatre Works
Defining Moment

When Samar is alone on stage and shares a monologue detailing how they were arrested and what the doctor and the soldiers did to them.


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Defining Moment

Clare describing the killing of John Williams


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Defining Moment

Final scene when Lee lies down on the crosswalk


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Defining Moment

Lee & Del's dance


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Defining Moment

Sound design


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Defining Moment

The ambiantic street sounds and street scene that set the stage for the play. Solid choices of not having music, and a thoughfully envisioned and flexible set.


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Defining Moment

The closing moment--the male lead lies down in the crosswalk in which the key, absent event of the play took place.


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Defining Moment

The description of the shooting.


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Defining Moment

The very end, when Clare lays down the White Deer symbol and Lee lays down on it.


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Defining Moment

The way the play unraveled, slowly giving away its secrets, was at once thrilling and heartbreaking and horrifying.


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Defining Moment

When the play opens and "Claire" comes u9t to begin her "lecture" although even then we didn't know how extensively it would be a rant.


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Other/Final Comments

Love the theater space and the use of it, and the crowd. Getting an audience! Well done. House management excellent.


 Vicinity / Memoryall  - VelMar Works
Other/Final Comments

The sound design was fantastic and served the play very well.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Amy Helms (Sophie Scholl)

Really believable, strong physical presence in a difficult role. Wide range of emotions.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Ben Wippel (Hans Scholl)

Very well cast in this role. Did an outstanding job.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Comments (Costume)

All correct choices for the period, and the right aspects of personality brought out for each character.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Comments (Direction)

I thought the direction of this play was very good. The beats were clear, the production was successful in bringing out the play’s most essential ideas without excluding lesser yet important ones. This is a tricky space to direct in and I had seats way up in the balcony, and I felt that I could see most of the action.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Comments (Direction)

Not easy to stage-- but this production never felt static or forced. It had so many memorable moments in it.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Comments (Lighting)

The lighting helped tell the story and was very subtle throughout. It was keyed to the style and tone of the show. It felt harsh and dramatic- fitting of an interrogation room in Nazi Germany. The lighting was motivated from sources provided or inferred by the set design and staging. The final moment of the play with the light streaming through the doors was truly beautifull.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Comments (Scenic)

I've been impressed with the scenic design for every show I've seen at Taproot, and this was no exception, taking a relatively sparse set and making it pop.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Comments (Scenic)

Simple but very effective and some imaginative ideas that I have not seen elsewhere on stages around town. High quality production values! Great looking set!


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Comments (Scenic)

The set was very simple and specific. It served the needs of the production and allowed the actors to use the space to the advantage of the production. The large thrust was fairly contained as the examination room, and was open enough that most audience members could see everything. The bleakness of the set, specifically the backdrop with the dirty windows and prison-like doors, clearly established theme and mood, and communicated place and locale, time and period.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Comments (Sound/Music)

helps create the world of the play without being distracting. I enjoyed the voice over work of the students protesting and I thought that was a clever way of tying in the message of the play and the larger scale during the moments in between scenes when there wasn't much else happening.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

A soft, simple light cast on the uneven brick facing of the back wall represented the strengths of this simple, sensitive production. Helms' and Stutzman's generous listening and director Scott Nolte's restrained directing were exactly what this script calls for and deserves.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

At the heroine's final exit, she walks down a narrowing (forced perspective) hallway into bright light.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

I think one of the defining moments of the show was when Sophie believed she was speaking to her brother Hans and it was a dream. The use of "Ms. Scholl" from her brother's mouth was just heartbreaking.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

Scene with Sophie standing and not be allowed to move.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

Sophie realizing she must confess or betray her brother.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

Sophie tearing the confession in half was the most defining moment for me.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

The final look, with Sophie being lead off to her death.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

The moment at the very end when Sophie Scholl walks through the gate to her trial. The entire set opened up with bright lights- it was stunning.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

The moment that the woman played Sophie Scholl said the line about “no one will ever remember us”, I felt the resounding importance and beauty of the show. It was ironic to see her say this because the character felt that her actions would never be recognized, but the way the actor said it, almost poignantly as a jab at the cruelty Scholl faced, displayed how important it is this play exists. It showed not only Scholl’s importance to history and to defying cruelty, but just how important it was that we never lost sight of that importance.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

The scene in which Grunewald repeatedly barked at Sophie to stay back against the wall.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

The set opening up at the end to reveal the long hallway


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

Watching Sophie struggle to remain standing up was difficult and visceral to watch.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

When Grunwald finally breaks down about his son and his own service to the government. I felt that Stutzman handled that moment very well. He really embraced the vulnerability and the rawness of that feeling. I found it moving.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Defining Moment

When the soldier opens the back sliding door and reveals the long bright tunnel that will lead Sophie to her death.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Jonathan Stutzman (Kurt Grunwald)

A great range of emotions from this actor~ Terrific job!


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Jonathan Stutzman (Kurt Grunwald)

Excellent work. Complex, vulnerable, real.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Jonathan Stutzman (Kurt Grunwald)

Pretty much flawless. He managed to be sympathetic and intimidating all at once.


 We Will Not Be Silent  - Taproot Theatre Company
Other/Final Comments

This was a terrific production of a difficult show. I thought Taproot did a fantastic job with this one~


 West Side Story  - The 5th Avenue Theatre
Alexander Gil Cruz (Bernardo)

Loved this actor's physicality especially during the knife scene. His movements almost were swarthy and primal and turned almost animalistic at times.


 West Side Story  - The 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Actors)

Gabriel Corey was great in "Gee, Officer Krupke.


 West Side Story  - The 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Costume)

Brilliant bold color choices for the Sharks and Jets never left me guessing who belonged to which gang. The women's dresses for the Sharks were delightful and the high slits on the Jet girls created a dynamic and sultry flare when they danced.


 West Side Story  - The 5th Avenue Theatre
Comments (Direction)

The stage pictures int his production were really lovely. Even in a musical, it can be hard to play to the balcony but this staging always filled the space completely and created beautiful potent pictures with the use of levels and bodies moving in and off the set.